Older Movies (from before 1980) on Blu-Ray

                                     (last updated 9/10/14)

 

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While the vast majority of Blu-ray releases since the format’s commercial debut in 2006 continue to be films and video programs produced during the past decade, there has been a slow but steady increase in the number of older films transferred to high definition video masters for HDTV broadcasts, and a limited but growing number receiving Blu-ray releases. The selection of both major and obscure “catalog titles” on Blu-ray expanded substantially in 2011, with even more released in 2012, and in 2013 more pre-1980 films showed up on Blu-ray or were announced for release than during the entire first four or five years after Blu-rays were introduced. Many of these releases, especially since 2012, have been from small distributors licensing the rights from the major studios who prefer to concentrate only on their recent productions except for a few token classics with widespread name recognition (such as The Ten Commandments, Psycho, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Lawrence of Arabia, The Sound of Music, etc.). A number of notable titles are available only outside of the U.S., but several are either not region-locked or support both regions A and B, and may be easily ordered from overseas (e.g. City Girl, Great Expectations, Ashes and Diamonds, et al.).

 

The majority of older releases showing up on Blu-ray so far are from the 1980s, 70s, and 60s, perhaps not coincidentally the years many current Blu-ray and Home Theatre enthusiasts grew up, as well as a period after widescreen film formats had become firmly established and color photography had replaced black-and-white as the standard. Predictably, the more recent the decade, the more titles are available, with more than 200 each from the 1970s and 1960s. Nevertheless, there is already quite a respectable and growing selection of well over 150 titles from the 1950s, a modest sampling from the 1940s (including multi-disc sets of Sherlock Holmes films and U.S. Govt. World War II documentaries), several key classics from the 1930s (especially the “magic” year of 1939) and a few dozen major titles from the 1920s (including most of Buster Keaton’s silent comedies), and even a few features from the 1910s. (The first was an added bonus feature on a 1939 title, but an official release of a 1915 film finally happened in November 2011, with several others in 2012-13). A few more 1910s films and more 1920s silents are scheduled to appear on Blu-ray in 2014. Two of the classic 1950s 3-D films came out in 3-D Blu-ray editions in October 2012 (Dial M for Murder and Creature from the Black Lagoon), with House of Wax following in October 2013 and more planned for 2014. Selected classics from throughout the 20th century have been released by Universal and Paramount, as both film studios marked their centennials in 2012. Also since late 2011 and early 2012, several small distributors (notably Olive and Twilight Time) have been licensing and releasing numerous off-beat or lesser-known pre-1980 films (mostly 1950s and 1960s) from the Paramount, Republic, Columbia, and 20th Century Fox collections. In November 2012, Warner Brothers’ Archives Collection began making limited-run Blu-ray editions of several of its less mainstream catalog titles known to have devoted fans but not expected to sell in large numbers on the mass market.

 

As more people adopt HDTV and acquire Blu-ray players, demand for a wider variety of films beyond recent theatrical hits has increased. More pre-1980 films came out on Blu-ray just during the past two years than during the first five years Blu-ray discs were on the market and releases continue to rise steadily.

 

Among the older movies already available or coming soon on Blu-ray are:

- Several genuine all-time classic films, American and foreign, silent and sound

- More than three-fourths of all the “Best Picture” Oscar-winners and many nominees

       (including the very first from 1927, selected titles from the 1930s through the 1980s, and all recent winners)

- A number of notable genre pictures, primarily from the 1950s, 60s, and 70s

      (especially war, western, sci-fi, horror, action, film noir, some musicals, and some animated cartoons)

- Most of Buster Keaton’s silent comedies

- A few Charlie Chaplin features and shorts

- A few Harold Lloyd features and shorts

- Selected silent features by major stars or directors

- A wide sampling of films by John Ford, Elia Kazan, Fritz Lang, John Huston,

      Otto Preminger, David Lean, Jean-Luc Godard, and other noted directors

- Over 20 Alfred Hitchcock films

- All of Stanley Kubrick’s features

- Most of the major Marilyn Monroe films

- Numerous John Wayne films

- All of the “James Bond” films

- All of the “Sherlock Holmes” films starring Basil Rathbone

- The eight most iconic classic Universal horror films

- Several box office hits from their eras

- Several widescreen epics, “roadshow” releases, and early CinemaScope films

- Several films made to be shown in the 3-panel “Cinerama” process

- A large number of “cult classics” and “grindhouse” exploitation films

- A large number of routine program pictures, especially genre titles

- Several of the classic 3-D films from the 1950s

- Several 1950s and 1960s TV series, mainly sci-fi and fantasy, and classic sit-coms

 

 

 

MOVIE TECHNOLOGY THEN AND NOW: How good can it be?

  --  There are still people who question why movies over 20 years old, let alone 40 or 60 or 75 years old or older should even be transferred to Blu-ray, since “HD wasn’t even available back then.” Well, it’s true that HD video was not available back then, but those films were not shot on any of the video formats that have been the only way most people have ever seen them for at least an entire generation now. They were shot on film, a completely different technology that records actual visible images photochemically instead of encoding them electronically or digitally, and uses precision mechanical devices instead of sophisticated electronics to recreate the illusion of motion. Compared with the standard television technology that was used from the late 1930s until the mid-2000s, film has always been high-definition, whereas until the so-called “HDTV” standards were gradually introduced to the public in the 1990s and early 2000s, consumer video has always been low-definition. Television sets and video recording/playback formats often could not even reproduce more than about a quarter of the “standard-definition” image resolution that commercial television stations were capable of broadcasting. (Even the current HDTV broadcast television and streaming HD formats have higher audio-video compression rates and lower quality than properly-encoded Blu-ray versions of the same content, while the best Blu-rays are still more compressed than the HD files used for digital cinemas, which are still compressed versions of the original digital movie files transferred from film or shot with professional HD digital cameras.)

 

  -- Film has been an effective medium for photographing, projecting, and storing motion pictures for some 120 years now, since the early 1890s. Although during 2008-2013 the major studios shifted largely away from distributing movies on 35mm film prints in favor of cheaper digital technology, many movies continue to be shot on film. And due to rapidly-changing digital standards, film copies remain the only reliable archival medium for long-term preservation of any movies (even if they were shot digitally). The 35mm film format was used in the 1890s as the smallest, most cost-effective medium for recording a high-quality image. As the photographic emulsions of film continued to improve in both image resolution ability and light sensitivity, by the 1920s the smaller 16mm film could look as sharp as 35mm images of a decade or two previous, whereas 35mm film remained four times sharper than 16mm. When originally photographed, all film looks brand-new, so a good high-definition Blu-ray transfer of an old movie that has been perfectly preserved will look just as good as it did when the film was shot. However, repeated use can introduce damage and eventually will cause a film to wear out. Film breaks that have been repaired often result in missing footage, from a few frames to several seconds or minutes. Poor storage conditions can cause film to deteriorate or even decompose into dust. And every time a film is copied (including new preservation negatives made from other prints and then reprinted) the duplicate never quite reproduces all the clarity of the copy it was copied from, and usually increases the contrast so that bright and dark areas of the image lose detail, as well as increasing the graininess. Old movies that are transferred to Blu-ray from old, beat-up film prints, or copies of other copies, will look just as bad as those copies in an accurate, high-quality HD transfer. Trying to improve them digitally may erase some dust and scratches, but without extreme care such “noise reduction” can also soften or smear fine details. Attempts to smooth out film grain or do major readjustments to contrast levels usually obliterate even more detail. The grain of the film is what contains the image information, so any misguided attempt to remove the appearance of grain always makes the picture look less sharp than it did before. Attempts to sharpen such a softened image by introducing electronic edge enhancement (a halo-like highlight around all objects) will provide an illusion of sharpness on very small or low-resolution video monitors, but when seen on a large, high-definition monitor will look more like a “ghost” image and obscure even more detail. Compounding image degradation in digital transfers is the use of digital compression to save storage space. Highly compressed and/or poorly compressed digital copies, whether high-definition or standard-definition, will introduce even more image anomalies and digital artifacts that are compounded by or intensify the image distortions resulting from the use of digital noise reduction and edge enhancement. Because of this, it is quite possible for a good standard-definition copy on a DVD to look substantially sharper and display more detail than a poorly compressed, overly processed, and otherwise incompetently made high-definition transfer on a Blu-ray.

 

  -- Older films tend to look better when transferred directly to an HD format that reproduces what the film looks like, rather than artificially readjusting it to look like video. Different films, both old and new, have different grain structures inherent to the types of film stock used to shoot them and the film stocks used to make prints. The more times a film is copied from other copies, the coarser the grain structure becomes. Thus, older films with optically-printed visual effects (even simple dissolves between shots that are not done in-camera) will suddenly get extra-grainy for the duration of the optical effect and then become less-grainy for the other parts of the film. If all that survives is a copy of a copy rather than the original negative or an original print from the original negative, the entire film will look grainier still. A growing number of people have never seen many movies projected from real film, especially older titles, and since standard-definition video does not have enough resolution to reproduce the original film grain structure, they’ve never been able to see the original grain patterns or can only notice it on the multi-generation copies of copies. Other people sit in the back half of the theatre where they are too far away from the screen to see the natural film grain that makes up the image. These are the people who are surprised to see grain in “high definition” video transfers of films, and mistakenly assume that erasing the film’s original grain somehow “improves” the image, whereas it actually degrades the image and imitates the video look.

 

  -- While certain types of film damage, like scratches, tears, and dirt accumulation, can be very effectively “repaired” or erased digitally, any details already lost in film-to-film duplication and reduplication (“dupe” prints made from dupe negatives) can never be regained in a digital transfer. Digital technology can excel, however, at compensating for image jitter resulting from old film negatives or prints that are shrunken or have damaged sprocket holes, and it is especially effective at recombining the separate black-and-white color records of two-color and three-strip Technicolor films in ways that may actually look better than original color prints would have looked. In certain cases, missing footage can be restored by painstakingly inserting it from multiple incomplete prints, and digital manipulation can attempt to match the picture quality with varying results, depending on the quality of surviving copies.

 

  -- If original film negatives still survive in good condition, and if a digital transfer from that original material is done properly (i.e., without obvious Digital Noise Reduction or Edge Enhancement), old movies often look as good as and sometimes even better than Blu-ray copies of recent movies. If the actual negative no longer survives, a high-quality print made directly from the original camera negative can also yield an excellent high-definition video transfer. The reason for this is that (if they were properly manufactured, exposed, developed, and printed) standard 35mm film stocks for the past 100 years, and even many 16mm film emulsions, have always had higher resolution capability than the current 1920 x 1080p so-called “full HDTV” standard. The new “Ultra-HD” 4K video standard is four times the resolution of the “2K” 1080p HDTV standard (twice as wide and twice as high: 3840 x 2160p), and is approximately equal to the sharpness of regular 35mm movie film. And of course films shot on larger format negatives like VistaVision, Super Technirama, 56mm, Todd-AO, 65mm, Cinerama, and especially IMAX are many, many times sharper than HDTV or even “Ultra HD” can reproduce. In other words, home video quality is only now just catching up to where 35mm film was about a century ago, while modern film stocks keep getting better and are substantially sharper than those of 40-50 years ago. Since the late 1970s, most 35mm theatrical release prints have been made from duplicate (“dupe”) negatives copied from a master positive that was struck from the original camera negative, resulting in a minor degradation of sharpness with each generation of copying. This makes the picture sharpness of a 2K digital cinema or Blu-ray nearly identical to what most 35mm commercial movie theatres have actually been showing the past 30-40 years. The few (but growing number of) 4K digital cinemas can show approximately the quality of a 35mm showprint made directly from camera negatives for big-city prestige theatres, which is still usually substantially less resolution than the premium 70mm roadshow theatres would exhibit (which would require closer to 8K of digital data to reproduce). However, it must also be remembered that while HDTV and Blu-ray images may appear to approach the resolution of film, the images are digitally compressed to a high degree: each pixel of each frame is NOT a one-to-one reproduction of what’s on the film, but is a cleverly-reconstructed approximation from a limited amount of data to save storage space. Thus, “high definition” video may look impressive, and gets better every year, but still has a long way to go before it can replace film!

 

  -- Audio quality of films made before the 1990s, on the other hand, may have more obvious differences when compared to modern digitally-recorded multitrack stereo films. However, they can still sound extremely impressive if the original magnetic recordings survive in good condition rather then merely the optical sound negatives that were used to make standard release prints. In fact, many major films from about 1953 and after were actually recorded in 3-track, 4-track, or 6-track magnetic stereo, even if they were often shown with mono optical sound (or after the late 1970s with stereo optical sound). Films made in the 1930s and 1940s were originally recorded with optical rather than magnetic sound technology, so will never quite have the wide frequency response and dynamic range possible with magnetic or digital recording. Most sound films from the 1920s were recorded with electro-mechanical technology onto wax discs. But even they can sound amazingly good if the original recordings or soundtrack masters survive, were well taken care of, and can be digitally restored. The quality of the audio actually recorded was often substantially better than could be reproduced in most theatres at the time, especially after the release-print soundtracks had started to wear out. If the individual music, dialogue, and sound effects tracks happen to survive for films never released with stereo sound, they can actually be remixed into a genuine stereophonic soundtrack rather than the simulated stereo “echo” effect sometimes added digitally to mono soundtracks. With great effort and elaborate specialized computer software, a plain mono soundtrack can be painstakingly reprocessed to create a reasonably effective stereo soundtrack (as was done with Hitchcock’s Psycho) but obviously original multi-track audio and stereo music recordings will be much easier to repurpose into a modern-sounding stereo soundtrack.

 

  -- The convenience and relatively low expense of Blu-ray technology has made it possible for us to see and hear films from the past at home with at almost the same quality they would have been seen during their first showings in the best theatres. Old movies may actually look and sound better now than during their initial releases (especially in later showings in lesser theatres after prints began to wear out), or at revival showings copied from dupe negatives instead of the original camera negatives. In cases where original film elements have been well-preserved, it becomes obvious that the older standards of 35mm film image quality (printing, processing, and projecting) often equal or exceed the hastily-made film prints projected in today’s modern multiplexes. And of course, like DVDs, Blu-rays can be stored and played with a convenience undreamt of just a generation ago when a film collection (especially on 35mm) required not only a huge expense but a huge storage space, along with more labor-intensive exhibition procedures. Nevertheless, all Blu-rays are not created equal, with HD transfers by major studios and small independent distributors alike varying in their faithfulness to the original film images -- some crisp and clear, with others soft and fuzzy due to over-application of digital “cleanup” techniques. Already several films first released to Blu-ray back in 2006-2009 have been remastered with more careful attention paid to preserving the quality and original appearance of the film, rather than digitally erasing grain and/or adding artificial halo-like edge enhancement. Such DNR and EE processes were once standard to give the illusion of sharpness on small, standard-definition TV sets but now result in obvious degrading of the image on a high-definition TV monitor or projector. The best new transfers are mastered at 4K resolution (about as sharp as good 35mm film) and later downscaled to Blu-ray’s 1080 x 1920-pixel (2K) image.

 

 

 

TV TECHNOLOGY THEN AND NOW:

Why are most older TV shows so much sharper than many newer ones?

 

  -- Many TV programs were originally shot on 35mm film, and (again, assuming the original negatives have survived in good condition) when they are scanned to HD masters for HDTV and Blu-ray they will look drastically better than they ever did on the best televisions or studio monitors at the time they were made. They’ll look about as good as the 35mm film prints would have appeared in studio screening rooms. However, all those TV programs that were originally shot on videotape, or those broadcast live and recorded by “kinescope” (filmed by a movie camera aimed at a TV monitor), can never look as good as the Blu-ray format is capable of, although they will look more or less the same as they did when first seen on television (once again, depending upon the condition of the surviving material). By the 1990s, many TV shows, even those that were shot on film, were edited on video, so the edited masters exist only in standard-definition video formats (even though they were broadcast-quality at the time they were made). To make these look as good as they potentially could, the original film negatives to the programs would have to be scanned in high definition and re-edited, with all special effects redone to match the original completed programs. In many if not most cases it is economically unlikely that this would ever happen. Over the past 10 years or so, a number of TV programs (as well as theatrical movies) have been shot on high-definition video. These should normally equal the sharpness potential of current HDTV and Blu-ray, although depending upon their original formats and shooting styles they may or may not exhibit the contrast range and color subtleties possible with film (which is still the preferred shooting format for the majority of theatrical films and most dramatic TV shows).

 

 

 

-- North American Region A or multi-region releases

available or announced by mid-September 2014 --

(*Selected European releases - smaller light font Region B only - bold titles also playable in Region A) Numerous other films, including both American and International productions, classic and relatively recent, are available on Blu-ray in Region B-locked releases only.

 

Note that some Region A players may not be able to play the PAL standard-definition content sometimes used for bonus features on European discs, even if it is region-free, but the 1080p HD content will still be compatible, while other Region A players can play PAL content with no problem as long as it’s not region-encoded.

 

 

TITLE

DATE

ORIGINAL STUDIO

Blu-ray Distrib (if different)

 

 

 

 

 

 

====================== 1900s =====

======

====================

================================

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trip to the Moon, A

1902

Méliès Star

Flicker Alley (includes new HD documentary & 2 other Méliès shorts in SD)

 

Mack Sennett Collection, Vol. 1 (3-disc set of 50 films)

1909-33

Mack Sennett

Flicker Alley (mostly shorts of varying quality, and 2 features)

 

 

 

 

 

 

====================== 1910s =====

======

====================

================================

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inside of the White Slave Traffic, The

1913

Samuel H. London

Kino (half-hour abridgement, same disc as Devil’s Needle)

 

In the Land of the Head Hunters

1914

Edward S. Curtis

(sometime in 2014) Milestone

 

Birth of a Nation, The

1915

Griffith-Epoch

Kino - also includes 7 bonus Biograph shorts in SD

 

Children of Eve, The

1915

Edison

Kino (same disc as The Devil’s Needle)

 

Submarine Pirate, A

1915

Sennett

Flicker Alley set of Mack Sennett vol. 1 (25m runtime)

 

Vampires, Les

1915-16

Gaumont

Kino

 

Chaplin’s Mutual Comedies

1916-17

Mutual

Flicker Alley

 

Devil’s Needle, The

1916

Triangle/Fine Arts

Kino (same disc as The Children of Eve)

 

Intolerance

1916

Griffith

Cohen Film Collection

 

Bucking Broadway

1917

Universal

Criterion (on Stagecoach BluRay)

 

Poor Little Rich Girl

1917

Paramount

Milestone 3-disc Mary Pickford set

 

Fall of Babylon, The

1919

Griffith

Cohen Film Collection (bonus w/Intolerance)

 

Hoodlum, The

1919

First National

Milestone 3-disc Mary Pickford set

 

Mother and the Law, The

1919

Griffith

Cohen Film Collection (bonus w/Intolerance)

 

 

 

 

 

 

====================== 1920s =====

======

====================

================================

 

Cabine of Dr. Caligari, The

1920

Decla

(11/18/14) Kino

 

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

1920

Paramount

Kino

 

Down on the Farm

1920

Sennett

Flicker Alley set of Mack Sennett vol. 1

 

Penalty, The

1920

Goldwyn

Kino

 

Saphead, The

1920

Metro

Kino

 

Way Down East

1920

Griffith

Kino

 

Buster Keaton shorts (3-disc set of 19 shorts)

1920-23

Metro

Kino - also includes bonus shorts

 

Phantom Carriage, The

1921

Svensk

Criterion

 

Foolish Wives

1922

Universal

Kino

 

*Loves of Pharaoh, The (Das Weib des Pharao)

1922

UFA/Paramount

Alpha-Omega gmbh (Ger.)

 

Nanook of the North

1922

Pathe

Flicker Alley (incl. The Wedding of Palo)

 

Nosferatu

1922

Prana

Kino

 

Sherlock Holmes

1922

Goldwyn

Kino

 

Extra Girl, The

1923

Sennett

Flicker Alley set of Mack Sennett vol. 1

 

Hunchback of Notre Dame, The

1923

Universal

Flicker Alley

 

Our Hospitality

1923

Metro

Kino (includes early alternate cut & HD short)

 

Safety Last!

1923

Pathe

Criterion

 

Ten Commandments, The

1923

Paramount

in box set w/1956 remake

 

Three Ages, The

1923

Metro

Kino (same disc as Sherlock Jr)

 

*Great White Silence, The

1924

Herbert Ponting

BFI (U.K.) includes 90 Degrees South

 

Navigator, The

1924

Metro

Kino

 

Niebelungen, Die – Siegried, Kriemhild’s Rache

1924

Ufa

Kino

 

Sherlock, Jr.

1924

Metro

Kino (same disc as Three Ages)

 

Thief of Bagdad, The

1924

United Artists

Cohen Film Collection

 

Big Parade, The

1925

MGM

Warner

 

Freshman, The

1925

Pathe

Criterion

 

Go West

1925

Metro-Goldwyn

Kino (same disc as Battling Butler)

 

Gold Rush, The

1925

United Artists

Criterion (includes 1942 sound reissue)

 

Master of the House

1925

(Denmark)

Criterion

 

Seven Chances

1925

Metro-Goldwyn

Kino

 

Strike

1925

Goskino

Kino

 

Battleship Potemkin

1926

Goskino

Kino

 

Battling Butler

1926

MGM

Kino (same disc as Go West)

 

Black Pirate, The

1926

United Artists

Kino

 

Metropolis

1926

UFA

Kino

 

General, The

1926

United Artists

Kino

 

Late Mathias Pascal, The

1926

Films Armor (France)

Flicker Alley

 

Sparrows

1926

United Artists

Milestone 3-disc Mary Pickford set

 

College

1927

United Artists

Kino

 

Jazz Singer, The

1927

Warner Bros

 

Last Performance, The

1927/1929

Universal

Criterion Fejos set

 

*Seventh Heaven

1927

Fox

Carlotta (Fr.) (NOTE: piano score instead of Movietone)

 

Sunrise

1927

Fox

(includes European cut)

 

Wings

1927

Paramount

 

In Old Arizona

1928

Fox

20th Century Fox

 

Lonesome

1928

Universal

Criterion Fejos set

 

*Street Angel

1928

Fox

Carlotta (Fr.)

 

Steamboat Bill, Jr.

1928

United Artists

Kino (incl. 2 different cuts)

 

Broadway

1929

Universal

Criterion Fejos set

 

Phantom of the Opera, The

1929

Universal

Image Entertainment (incl. 1925 cut in SD) (NOTE: 1st pressing had authoring errors)

 

*Lucky Star

1929

Fox

Carlotta (Fr.)

 

====================== 1930s =====

======

====================

================================

 

Abraham Lincoln

1930

United Artists

Kino

 

All Quiet on the Western Front

1930

Universal

(includes silent version in SD)

 

Betty Boop: The Essential Collection Volume 2

1930-34

Paramount

Olive

 

Big Trail, The

1930

Fox

(includes both 70mm & 35mm versions in HD)

 

Blue Angel, The (Die Blaue Engel)

1930

Paramount/Ufa

Kino (both German and English-language versions)

 

*City Girl

1930

Fox

Eureka MoC (U.K.)

 

People on Sunday (Menschen am Sonntag)

1930

Siodmak/Ulmer

Criterion

 

City Lights

1931

United Artists

Criterion

 

Dracula

1931

Universal

in monsters box set (includes Spanish-language version)

 

Frankenstein

1931

Universal

in monsters box set

 

Gow The Head Hunter (aka Cannibal Island)

1931

Edward Salisbury

Flicker Alley w/Most Dangerous Game

 

Little Caesar

1931

Warner Bros

 

M

1931

Nero

Criterion (incl. English language version in SD)

 

Public Enemy, The

1931

Warner Bros

 

Betty Boop: The Essential Collection Volume 1

1932-37

Paramount

Olive

 

Betty Boop: The Essential Collection Volume 3

1932-38

Paramount

Olive

 

Betty Boop: The Essential Collection Volume 4

1932-37

Paramount

(9/30/14) Olive

 

Bird of Paradise

1932

RKO

Kino

 

Death Kiss, The

1932

World Wide

(10/7/14 ) Kino

 

Farewell to Arms, A

1932

Paramount

Kino

 

Grand Hotel

1932

MGM

Warner

 

Hell’s House

1932

Capitol

Kino

 

Island of the Lost Souls

1932

Paramount

Criterion

 

Most Dangerous Game, The

1932

RKO

Flicker Alley w/Gow the Headhunter

 

Mummy, The

1932

Universal

in monsters box set

 

White Zombie

1932

United Artists

Kino (NOTE: 2 copies on disc, one w/heavy DNR, one “raw”)

 

Cavalcade

1933

Fox

20th Cent Fox

 

Design for Living

1933

Paramount

Criterion

 

Invisible Man, The

1933

Universal

in monsters box set

 

Lady for a Day

1933

Columbia

Inception Media Group

 

*90 Degrees South

1933

Herbert Ponting

BFI (U.K.) (same disc as The Great White Silence)

 

King Kong

1933

RKO

Warner

 

Perfect Understanding

1933

United Artists

Cohen

 

Babes in Toyland

1934

MGM

Legend

 

It Happened One Night

1934

Columbia

(11/25/14) Criterion

 

L’Atalante

1934

Argui

Criterion (Jean Vigo set, incl. Zero for Conduct and shorts)

 

Lost Keaton: 16 Comedy Shorts

1934-37

Educational

Kino

 

Man Who Knew Too Much, The

1934

Gaumont

Criterion

 

Of Human Bondage

1934

RKO

Kino

 

Our Daily Bread

1934

United Artists

(sometime in 2014 or 15) Inception Media

 

Wedding of Palo, The (Palos Brudefaerd)

1934

(Denmark)

Flicker Alley (incl. Nanook of the North and HD shorts)

 

Bride of Frankenstein, The

1935

Universal

in monsters box set

 

Call of the Wild, The

1935

20th Century/UA

20th Cent Fox

 

Mutiny on the Bounty

1935

MGM

Warner

 

New Frontier, The

1935

Republic

Olive

 

*Ruggles of Red Gap, The

1935

Paramount

Eureka (U.K.)

 

She

1935

RKO

Legend (with Things To Come)

 

The 39 Steps

1935

Gaumont

Criterion

 

Westward Ho

1935

Republic

Olive

 

King of the Pecos

1936

Republic

Olive

 

Lawless Nineties, The

1936

Republic

Olive

 

Little Lord Fauntleroy

1936

Selznick

Kino

 

Lonely Trail, The

1936

Republic

Olive

 

Looney Tunes Platinum Collection: vol. 1

1936-66

Warner Bros

Warner 3-disc set of 50 HD cartoons, more as SD bonuses

 

Looney Tunes Platinum Collection: vol. 2

1936-66

Warner Bros

Warner 3-disc set of 50 HD cartoons, more as SD bonuses

 

Looney Tunes Platinum Collection: vol. 3

1936-66

Warner Bros

Warner 3-disc set of 50 HD cartoons

 

Modern Times

1936

United Artists

Criterion

 

Petrefied Forest, The

1936

Warner Bros

 

Redes

1936

(Mexico)

Criterion (in Martin Scorsese World Cinema Project 6-film set)

 

Things To Come

1936

London

Criterion;  also Legend (with She) (NOTE: mediocre transfer of so-so print)

 

Three Stooges in 3D – 4 colorized, 3D-converted shorts

1936-49

Columbia

Legend (NOTE: converted to 3D and colorized only)

 

Dark Journey

1937

(Britain)

Cohen (Vivian Leigh Anniversary set)

 

*Edge of the World, The

1937

Pax

BFI (U.K., includes shorts in HD)

 

Fire Over England

1937

(Britain)

Cohen (Vivian Leigh Anniversary set)

 

Grand Illusion (La Grande Illusion)

1937

World

Lionsgate

 

*Make Way for Tomorrow

1937

Paramount

Eureka (U.K.)

 

Nothing Sacred

1937

Selznick

Kino

 

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

1937

Disney

incl. 8 Disney cartoons 1928-37

 

Star is Born, A

1937

Selznick

Kino

 

Storm in a Teacup

1937

(Britain)

Cohen (Vivian Leigh Anniversary set)

 

Adventures of Robin Hood, The

1938

Warner Bros

 

 

Christmas Carol, A

1938

MGM

(11/11/14) Warner

 

Lady Vanishes, The

1938

Gaumont

Criterion (includes Crook’s Tour)

 

Overland Stage Raiders

1938

Republic

Olive

 

Pals of the Saddle

1938

Republic

Olive

 

Red River Range

1938

Republic

Olive

 

Santa Fe Stampede

1938

Republic

Olive

 

St. Martin’s Lane

1938

(Britain)

Cohen (Vivian Leigh Anniversary set)

 

Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

1939

20th Century Fox

MPI box set

 

Drums Along the Mohawk

1939

20th Century Fox

Twilight Time

 

Four Feathers, The

1939

London

Criterion

 

Frontier Horizon

1939

Republic

Olive

 

Gone With the Wind

1939

Selznick-MGM

Warner

 

Gulliver’s Travels

1939

Fleischer/Paramount

Thunderbean, also Koch (NOTE: Koch editon has extremely poor and distorted transfer)

 

Hound of the Baskervilles, The

1939

20th Century Fox

MPI box set

 

Jesse James

1939

20th Century Fox

 

Mikado, The

1939

Universal

Criterion (includes HD silent short)