Tribal Resolutions

Tribal Resolutions and other Resolutions asking for the removal of the "Fighting Sioux" moniker and name

This listing only emphasizes those resolutions which come from North Dakotan Native Tribes or organizations.
"United Sioux Tribes Development Corporation"
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Chair
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe
Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe, Chair
Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe
Oglala Sioux Tribe
Rosebud Sioux Tribe
Yankton Sioux Tribe
Crow Creek Sioux Tribe
Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe
Native Media Center
Three Affiliated Tribes

"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored."

- Aldous Huxley

 

The United Sioux Tribes Development Corporation
[Note: The United Sioux Tribes Development Corporation does not speak for any tribal government or people-- it is a non-profit corporation with no authority over any single or collective group of Nations. It is in response to this letter that many of the following resolutions are directed.]

February 8, 1999

Mr. Earl Strinden
North Dakota Alumni Association
University of North Dakota
PO Box # 8157
Grand Forks, SD 58202

Dear Mr. Strinden,

As per conversation of February 8, 1999, you requested a letter from the United Sioux Tribes reflecting on the name Sioux. You mentioned, there were students opposed to the university of North Dakota using the name Sioux. The name Sioux was derogatory as the French gave the Sioux name as it meant snake in the grass, now it has become part of Sioux culture.

First, United States Congress designated through treaties with the Sioux Nation, the Great Sioux Nation settlement. The second was the Black Hills claims with the Sioux Nation, Custer was wiped out by the great Sioux nation and the fighting Sioux warriors. The Sioux tribes in South Dakota were never opposed to any one over the years for using the Sioux name. We always mentioned to the institutions or organizations not to use an Indian mascot, as it may be taken as derogatory for that ethnic group. There are businesses and Organizations that use the Sioux name in South Dakota, and that is their right just as free speech. The Chairman of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe doesn't really see a problem with the name Sioux being attached to the University of North Dakota although; we have not really consulted with all the Sioux Tribes yet.

Thank you very much Earl for your inquiry about our web-site home page.

Sincerely,

Clarence W. Skye
UST-Executive Director

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Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Chair
February 16, 1999

Dr. Kendall Baker, President
University of North Dakota

Dear Dr. Baker,

I hope the New Year has brought you many successes at UND as I am certain your office has as many challenges. As Chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, I have learned of some very interesting and troubling developments at your fine university. The matter I speak of is the use of the "Fighting Sioux" nickname and mascot at UND. As you know we have taken three specific actions in the recent years regarding this matter as a government representing well over 10,000 members. The purpose of this letter is to respectfully remind your office and any other entities. Directly or indirectly associated with UND of our position. It is of course very simple and very clear, "Eliminate and stop the use of the 'Fighting Sioux' nickname and caricature today."

President Baker, while I understand the word tradition is used as rationale to continue the use of the nickname, our people find it very offensive and disrespectful to say the least. This fact alone should compel those fine and respectful people at UND to find am ore suitable nickname for such a fine institution as the University of North Dakota. Furthermore, I have learned a prominent political figure and UND alumnus has stated that continued use of the Sioux nickname would keep our people from being isolated. Such views about our people and our capabilities or inabilities in his mind, will only perpetuate the ridiculous stereotypes that exist about American Indians in the United State as we enter a new century. Again, this type of ignorance demonstrates if not borders complete lack of respect for our people. Dr. Baker, it is well past the time to allow for any race of people to be used as a nickname or caricature for any reason. Respectfully, we ask your institution to hear our call to stop the use of the "Fighting Sioux" nickname immediately. IT is most unfortunate that matters have escalated to episodes where racial slurs and related acts have been reported to my office stemming form the Sioux nickname used by UND. Again, the elimination of the nickname would result in the elimination of such dehumanizing acts that I understand are a regular occurrence at UND athletic events. To subject our People, Students and their Children to such acts at UND are uncalled for and will not be tolerated.

Finally I understand in a letter dated February 8, 1999 to Mr. Earl Strinden, North Dakota Alumni Association from Mr. Clarence Skye, Executive Director, United Sioux Tribes of South Dakota ha led some to believe that the use of the Sioux nickname is not opposed by Sioux Tribes in South Dakota. Please understand that this is first of all NOT TRUE, and secondly, Mr. Clarence Skye does not speak for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe on this matter as some may have been led to believe upon reading the letter to Mr. Strinden. The actions taken by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe are simply of the contrary and call for the "Fighting Sioux" nickname to be discontinued for use by the University of North Dakota. In closing, President Baker, I hope our position is understood in that our respect for UND remains, only the nickname and mascot is challenged as it challenges our People, our History, our Culture, and our Generations to come. Our support and prayers continue with those students and other supporters at UND who seek to see the Sioux nickname eliminated at UND and at any other institutions who choose to use human beings as their Nicknames, Mascots, or Caricatures.

Sincerely,

Charles W. Murphy, Chairman
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe

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Standing Rock Sioux Tribe
REGULAR TRIBAL COUNCIL MEETING FOLLOW-UP

MEETING DATE: December 2, 1998 PAGE: 27

# 59. MOTION WAS MAED BY DEAN BEAR RIBS, SECONDED BY RANDY WHITE TO APPROVE TO OFFICIALLY USE THE TRIBAL EQUIPMENT TO MOVE FEMA TRAILERS.

AMENDED TO: To be used only for this project and to be returned upon completion of the project.

ROLL CALL VOTE: MURPHY, C. - EXCUSED

ARCHAMBAULT, D. E. KEEPSEAGLE, J. YES
BAILEY, V. E. LONG CHASE, F. YES
BEAR RIBS, D. YES MCLAUGHLIN, E. NO
BROWN OTTER, D. YES SEE WALKER, R. NO
CORDOVA, R. NO STRONG HEART, J. NO
DEFENDER. P. YES TAKEN ALIVE, J. YES
GATES, R. E. TWO BEARS, S. NO
IRON T. (CHAIRING) N.V. WHITE, R. YES

VOTE: YES - 7 NO - 5 NOT VOTING - 1

MOTION CARRIED. 4-EXCUSED

#60 MOTION WAS MADE BY JESSE TAKEN ALIVE, SECONDED BY DEAN BEAR RIBS, TO APPROVE THAT THE STANDING ROCK SIOUX TRIBAL COUNCILA PPROVES OF SUBMISSION OF LEGISLATION TO THE NORTH DAKOTA STATE GOVERNMENT OPPOSING THE USE OF AMERICAN INDIAN MASCOTS AND MONIKERS BY UNIVERSITY'S AND INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN NORTH DAKOTA SUCH LEGISLATION WILL BE CONSISTENT WITH PREVIOUS ACTIONS TAKEN BY THE STANDING ROCK TRIBAL COUNCIL.

ROLL CALL VOTE: MURPHY, C. - EXCUSED

ARCHAMBAULT, D. E. KEEPSEAGLE, J. YES
BAILEY, V. E. LONG CHASE, F. YES
BEAR RIBS, D. YES MCLAUGHLIN, E. YES
BROWN OTTER, D. YES SEE WALKER, R. YES
CORDOVA, R. YES STRONG HEART, J. YES
DEFENDER, P. YES TAKEN ALIVE, J. YES
GATES, R. E. TWO BEARS, S. YES
IRON, T. N.V. WHITE, R. YES

VOTE: YES - 12 NO - 0 NOT VOTING - 1 MOTION CARRIED. 4 - EXCUSED RESOLUTION NO. 078-98

WHEREAS, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe is an unincorporated Tribe of Indians, having accepted the Indian Reorganization Act of June 18, 1934, with the exception of Article 16; and the recognized governing body of the Tribe is known as the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Council; and

WHEREAS the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe had issued Resolution No. 356-92 to demand that the University of North Dakota discontinue the use of the name and mascot of the "Fighting Sioux"; and

WHEREAS, the University Administration has stated in the past that such actions, like the racially insensitive ones of October 24, 1992, will not be tolerated on campus; and

WHEREAS the University is sending a Dual Message to the students of UND, by attempting to provide a quality education for its students, but subjects indigenous students, namely those of the Lakota/Dakota Peoples of North America, to continued racial actions, by not changing its "Sioux" and "Fighting Sioux" nicknames; and

NOW THEREFORE LET IT BE RESOLVED, the undersigned Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Council hereby reaffirms the Resolution of December 3, 1992, specifically that the University of North Dakota should discontinue the use of the "Fighting Sioux" nickname.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the foregoing resolution shall be effective on this date and shall remain in full force effect thereafter. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Chairman and the Secretary of the Tribal Council are hereby authorized and instructed to sign this resolution for and on behalf of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

CERTIFICATION

We, the undersigned, Chairman and Secretary of the Tribal Council of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, hereby certify that the Tribal Council is composed of (17) members, of whom 16 constituting a quorum, were present at a meeting thereof, duly and regularly called, noticed, convened and held on the 11th day of FEBRUARY, 1998, and that the foregoing resolution was duly adopted by the affirmative vote of 10 members, with 0 opposing, and with 6 not voting. THE CHAIRMAN'S VOTE IS NOT REQUIRED EXCEPT IN CASE OF A TIE.

Dated this 11th day of FEBRUARY, 1998.

ATTEST:
Charles W. Murphy, Chairman
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe

Elaine MacLaughlin, Secretary
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe

WHEREAS, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe is an unincorporated Tribe of Indians, having accepted the Indian Reorganization Act of June 18, 1934, with the exception of Article 16; and the recognized governing body of the Tribe is known as the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Council; and

WHEREAS, the racially insensitive events of October 24, 1992, at the Homecoming Parade, are not isolated events, but rather an example of what Native Students at UND must endure while attempting to gain an education at the University, and

WHEREAS, the University Administration has stated in the past that such actions, like the racially insensitive ones of October 24, 1992, will not be tolerated on campus; and

WHEREAS, the University's continued use of the "Fighting Sioux" nickname places Native Students in the position of being mascots and subjects those students to such racially insensitive actions, and

WHEREAS, the University is sending a Dual Message to the students of UND,

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, the undersigned feel that the University of North Dakota should discontinue the use of the "Fighting Sioux" nickname. The undersigned further believe that the President of the University has the authority to discontinue the use of that nickname.

CERTIFICATION

We, the undersigned, Chairman and Secretary of the Tribal Council of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, hereby certify that the Tribal Council is composed of (17) members, of whom 16 constituting a quorum, were present at a meeting thereof, duly and regularly called, noticed, convened and held on the 3rd day of December, 1992, and that the foregoing resolution was duly adopted by the affirmative vote of 9 members, with 4 members voting, and 1 opposing. The Chairman's vote is not required except in case of a tie.

Dated this 3rd day of December, 1992.

ATTEST:
Charles W. Murphy, Chairman
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe

Elaine MacLaughlin, Secretary
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe

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Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe
February 19, 1999
Dr. Kendall Baker, President
University of North Dakota
Grand Forks, North Dakota

Ref: University of North Dakota "Fighting Sioux" mascot

Dear Dr. Baker,

I send you greetings from the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe and its 10,207 Members. The Lake Traverse Reservation has lands in both states of North and South Dakota currently and a magnificent history of these and other lands that our people are very much proud. My name is Andrew J. Grey, Sr., and I am the Chairman of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe. Today I write this letter to you for two specific reasons that I am certain you will find as important as we have. The issue surrounding these reasonslies with the nickname used by the institution of higher learning you lead respectively, the University of North Dakota. This nickname I speak of is the "Fighting Sioux" and any mascot or caricature so associated with its use.

The first matter of concern I wish to apprise you of is our support for those efforts that have been ongoing to see the change and elimination of such a nickname. The reason, of course, is simple: Use of a race of people as a nickname or mascot is totally unacceptable and only leads to the dehumanization of their Being, Culture, history and Children. Only when one is in this situation can you truly understand the full impact of such demeaning and dehumanizing behavior. What do we tell our beautiful children when they are subjected to such acts either personally or when they have to read or hear about their ancestors as nicknames or mascots and not humans. Dr. Baker, no amount of talk or money can address this most dire circumstance, only immediate action that results in the nickname change will be acceptable. The most recent passage of Resolution No. SWST-99-015 by our Government affirms our request to your office to change the "Fighting Sioux" nickname.

Secondly, we join our fellow Tribal Governments in stating that the United Sioux Tribes of South Dakota and its Director, Mr. Clarence Skye, does not speak for the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe in this matter of the "Fighting Sioux" nickname. This simple statement should not be interpreted in any other fashion. Our support to those efforts to change the nickname by students and groups remains until the use of the nickname by UND is banned.

In conclusion, I want to convey to your office that we continue to respect UND, however, remain opposed to the use of the "Fighting Sioux" nickname until it is changed.

Sincerely,

Andrew Grey Sr.
Tribal Chairman
Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe

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Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe
TRIBAL COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. SWST-99-015

Fighting Sioux Nickname

WHEREAS, The Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe is organized under a Constitution and By-Laws adopted by the members of the Tribe on August 1-2, 1966, and approved by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs on August 25, 1966; and

WHEREAS, The Constitution and By-Laws ARTICLE VII, Section 1, that the Tribe shall be governed by the Tribal Council, and that the Tribal Council shall have the power to: (a) represent the Tribe in all negotiations with federal, state and local governments; (c) to engage in any business that will further the economic development of the Tribe and its members and to use tribal funds or other resources for such purposes; (d) to make rules governing the relationship of the members of the Tribe, to Tribal property, and to one another as members of the Tribe; (g) to take actions by ordinance, resolution, or otherwise which are reasonably necessary, through committees, boards, agents, or otherwise to carry into effect the foregoing purposes; (h) to promote public health, education, charity and other services as may contribute to the social advancement of the members of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe; and (I) to adopt resolutions regulating the procedures of the Tribal Council, its officials and committees in the conduct of the Tribal Affairs; and

WHEREAS, The University Administration has stated in the past that actions such as the racially insensitive ones of October 24, 1992, will not be tolerated on campus; and,

WHEREAS, The continued use of the "Fighting Sioux" nickname by the University of North Dakota, places Native American Students in the position of being mascots, and subjects those students to such racially insensitive actions; and,

WHEREAS, The continued use of the nickname is sending a dual message to the students of the University of North Dakota.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, That the Tribal Council of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe hereby supports the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in their efforts to discontinue the use of the Fighting Sioux nickname; and,

FINALLY, BE IT RESOLVED, That the Tribal Council of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe herein requests the President of the University of North Dakota to exercise his authority and ban the use of that nickname.

CERTIFICATION

We, the undersigned, duly elected Chairman and Secretary of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribal Council do hereby certify that the above resolution was duly adopted by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribal Council, which is composed of 10 members, (representing a total of 15 Tribal Council weighted votes) of whom 8 constituting a quorum, were present at a Tribal Council meeting, duly noticed, called, convened and held at the Tiwakan TioTipi, Agency Village, South Dakota, February 4, 1999, by a vote of 8 for, 0 opposed, 0 opposed, 0 abstained, 5 absent from vote, 2 not voting, and that said Resolution has not been rescinded or amended in any way.

Dated this 12th of February, 1999.

Andrew J. Grey, Sr.
Tribal Chairman
Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe

ATTEST:

Darrell Quinn, Sr.
Tribal Secretary
Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe

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Oglala Sioux Tribe Executive Committee
February 12, 1999

Dr. Kendall Baker
The University of North Dakota
Grand Forks, North Dakota

Dear President Baker,

I write to inform you of our position regarding the UND mascot issue and related controversy recently brought to my attention. Before I begin, I hope all is well with you and those endeavors that face you daily. As President of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, the are many challenges that confront out People of major importance.

Mr. Baker, the mascot issue at your great university is one of these challenges. The reason for my statement is very simple in that no human race or human being should be used as a mascot.

Our position and I convey respectfully to you is that to stop the use of the "fighting Sioux" mascot and moniker at the University of North Dakota today. As we enter a new century there isn't any justifiable reason to continue to dehumanize a race of people, their history, their culture, and their children today. As a member of this race of people, and as President of the Oglala Sioux Tribe with an estimated population of 40,000, I ask your institution to stop the use of the "fighting Sioux" mascot and moniker.

As I understand one of the latest developments in this matter is a letter addressed to Mr. Earl Strinden from Mr. Clarence Skye of the United Sioux Tribes, Pierre, South Dakota. I want to assure you that our position on this matter is clear, and that Mr. Skye does not speak for the Oglala Sioux Tribe on this matter as proponents to keep the current mascot name at UND may be led to believe.

Our people, Elders, and children are precious to us and once leadership amongst my fellow tribal governments is well-informed, I believe that they will concur with our position. Again, please understand our position in that it is simple and we support those students and other supporters who seek to change and eliminate the fighting Sioux mascot and moniker at the University of North Dakota.

Respectfully,

Harold D. Salway, President
Oglala Sioux Tribe

RESOLUTION NO. 99-07XB

RESOLUTION OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE OGLALA SIOUX TRIBE (An Unincorporated Tribe)

RESOLUTION OF THE OGLALA SIOUX TRIBE, EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE SUPPORTING THE STANDING ROCK SIOUX TRIBE RESOLUTION NO. 078-98.

WHEREAS, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe had issued Resolution NO 356-92 to demand that the University of North Dakota discontinue the use of the name and mascot of the "Fighting Sioux", and

WHEREAS, the University Administration has stated in the past that such actions, like the racially insensitive ones of October 24, 1992, will not be tolerated on campus, and

WHEREAS, the University's continued use of the "Fighting Sioux" nickname places Native American students in the position of being mascots and subjects those students to such racially insensitive actions, and

WHEREAS, the University is sending a dual message to the students of the University of North Dakota, by attempting to provide a quality education for its students, but subjects its indigenous students, namely those from the Lakota/Dakota Peoples of North America to continued racial actions by not changing its "Sioux" and "Fighting Sioux" nicknames, now

THEREFORE, LET IT BE RESOLVED, the undersigned Oglala Sioux Tribe Executive Committee hereby support the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Council reaffirmation of the resolution of December 03, 1992, specifically that the University of North Dakota should discontinue the use of the "Fighting Sioux" nickname.

CERTIFICATION

I, as undersigned Secretary of the Executive Committee, hereby certify that this Resolution was adopted by the vote of 3 for; 0 against; and 0 not voting, during a REGULAR SESSION held on the 3rd day of FEBRUARY, 1999.

Stacy L. Two Lance
Secretary
Oglala Sioux Tribe

A-T-T-E-S-T:

Harold D. Salway
President
Oglala Sioux Tribe

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Rosebud Sioux Tribe
February 16, 1999

Dr. Kendall Baker, President
The University of North Dakota

Dear President Baker,

Most recently I have heard of a controversial issue occurring at the University of North Dakota. After being apprised of this matter at UND, I am compelled to write you and respectfully state our position on this issue. This controversy, of course, is the use of the "fighting Sioux" nickname by your institution of higher learning. After reviewing this situation, I am saddened and deeply concerned about the continued use of the "fighting Sioux", as it mimics and shows complete disrespect for the Sioux Tribe. I ask and strongly urge you and the institution you lead to stop the use of such a nickname and caricature as the 'fighting Sioux" immediately.

The reason is obvious and clear. This practice of using the "fighting Sioux" shows the complete lack of acknowledgment of this indigenous race of people. Dr. Baker, our people have a beautiful history, culture, and legacy that should not be subject to such demeaning acts for any reason, at any time. I might add that one act is too many and warrants the immediate elimination of the "fighting Sioux" nickname at the University of North Dakota.

Finally, I state that only the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, its people (32,000) and government only speak for us on this matter. Please consider this message to your office and other entities so associated with UND as our position regarding the "fighting Sioux" nickname. We extend our support to those students and others who seek to stop the use of the "fighting Sioux" nickname.

Respectfully,

Norman G. Wilson, President
Rosebud Sioux Tribe

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Yankton Sioux Tribe
February 19, 1999

Dr. Kendall Baker
University of North Dakota
Grand Forks, North Dakota

Dear Dr. Baker,

From the land of the friendly people of the Seven Council Fires we send you greetings. This letter will reaffirm our position in a letter to Chairman Charles Murphy of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe; we hereby reiterate our opposition to the use of the "Fighting Sioux" nickname by the university of North Dakota. People and their culture should not be degraded to such use and we ask UND to "do the right thing" and change its "Fighting Sioux" nickname.

When it comes to this issue, please share this letter with those involved in this matter. Most importantly, we want to state that only the Yankton Sioux Tribe speaks for itself on this subject. In particular, Mr. Earl Strinden and the UND alumni association must know of our position, as we understand that they may have been informed otherwise.

Dr. Baker, do not interpret our position regarding the "Fighting Sioux" nickname as being disrespectful to UND. In fact, our respect remains; however, we urge your university to change its nickname. In doing so, you will help to change a gross misunderstanding in history regarding our people. The fact that we are from the "Land of the Friendly People of the Seven Council Fires" will replace any misnomer that we condone violence, or that we are disrespectful.

Yours respectfully,

Stephen N. Cournover
Chairman
Yankton Sioux Tribe

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Crow Creek Sioux Tribe
February 18, 1999

Dr. Kendall Baker, President
University of North Dakota
Grand Forks, North Dakota

Dear Dr. Baker,

I wish to extend to you a heartfelt handshake from the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe located at Fort Thompson, South Dakota. My name is Harold Miller, and I am currently the Chairman of the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe. The intent of this correspondence is to share with you a fairly simple, but most serious matter that I believe needs my attention. Please accept and understand our position regarding the use of the "Fighting Sioux" nickname used by the University of North Dakota.

Our position is simple in that we oppose the use of the nickname, and kindly request that UND stop immediately the use of the "Fighting Sioux" nickname and/or mascot. It is most offensive to know the use of this nickname, as I understand it results in racial remarks and acts, publicly, in particular at sports events made when UND teams compete. This alone inclines us to take our position against the use of the "Fighting Sioux" nickname.

I understand that a letter from the United Sioux Tribes of South Dakota signed by Mr. Clarence Skye, has led some to believe that Sioux tribes in South Dakota are in favor of the UND nickname. Dr. Baker, please understand that Mr. Skye, and the February 8, 1999 letter to Earl Strinden do not speak for the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe on the UND nickname matter.

Please send our message and support to those students and supporters who seek and work to see the "Fighting Sioux" nickname discontinued at UND. Our respect for your University remains, likewise, our position regarding the nickname remains until it is eliminated.

Sincerely,

Harold D. Miller
Crow Creek Sioux Tribe

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Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe
DATE: FEBRUARY 19, 1999

TO: KENDALL BAKER, UND PRESIDENT

FR: GREGG BOURLAND, TRIBAL CHAIRMAN

RE: FIGHTING SIOUX

This memo again reiterates our opposition to the use of the name Fighting Sioux by UND. Attached is our resolution opposing it along with my memo to you of October 9, 1997.

Regardless of what any other tribe or tribal organization may have said, we still are in opposition to the use of this name.

Thank you for your time and consideration of this memo.

GREGG J. BOURLAND, TRIBAL CHAIRMAN

DA: OCTOBER 9, 1997

TO: KENDALL BAKER, UND PRESIDENT

FR: GREGG BOURLAND, TRIBAL CHAIRMAN

RE: USE OF THE NAME "FIGHTING SIOUX" RESOLUTION

Attached to this memo is a resolution passed by the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Council that requests:

"The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is respectfully requesting the University of North Dakota to do the moral and honorable thing, by removing and discontinuing the use of the mascot name "the Fighting Sioux".

As the leader and President of your University, I am certain that you will want to remove the name, now that you are aware of our concerns. Humanity has come a long way in the last one hundred years. Institutes of higher learning have helped to make that happen. The use of Native Americans as mascots (putting us in the same class as animals) is one of the last barriers facing colleges and universities to a real fulfillment of higher learning.

Thank you for your time and consideration of this memo.

GREGG J. BOURLAND, TRIBAL CHAIRMAN

RESOLUTION NO. 287-97-CR

WHEREAS, the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of South Dakota is an unincorporated tribe of Indians, having accepted the provision of the Act of June 18, 1934, (48 Stat. 984), and

WHEREAS, the Tribe, in order to establish its tribal organizations, to conserve its tribal property, to develop its common resources, and to promote the general welfare of its people, has ordained and established a Constitution and By-Laws, and

WHEREAS, the Lakota People are proud of their heritage and culture, and

WHEREAS, the use of the mascot name the "Fighting Sioux" has been brought to the tribe's attention by Native American Students at the University of North Dakota, and

WHEREAS, the use of this name is demeaning and derogatory to the Lakota Nation, and

WHEREAS, the Cheyenne River Sioux Nation respectfully requests the University of North Dakota to do the moral and honorable thing, buy removing and discontinuing the use of the mascot name "the Fighting Sioux", now

THEREFORE LET IT BE RESOLVED, that the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe is respectfully requesting the University of North Dakota to do the moral and honorable thing by removing and discontinuing the use of the mascot name "the Fighting Sioux".

CERTIFICATION

I, the undersigned as Secretary of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe certify that the Tribal Council is composed of fifteen (15) members of whom 11, constituting a quorum, were present at a meeting duly and specially called, noticed, convened and held this 8th day of October, 1997, Regular Session; and that the foregoing resolution was duly adopted at such meeting by an affirmative vote of 11 for, 0 against, 0 not voting, and 4 absent.

Arlene Thompson, Secretary
Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe

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Native Media Center
Date: February 3, 1999
To: UND students, staff, and faculty; Student Senators, President Kendall Baker; Vice President Robert Boyd; Vice President John Ettling, Leigh Jeanotte, Director of Native American Programs; Dr. Birgit Hans, Chair of Indian Studies Department; Terry Wanless, Athletic Director, Earl Strinden, Executive Director of Alumni Association; and Members of North Dakota's Fifty-Sixth Legislative Assembly
From: Native Media Center
Lynda Kenney, Director
Holly A. Annis, Assistant Director and
Native Directions staff and students
Re: Changing the University of North Dakota's "Fighting Sioux" nickname and logo

 

We are writing on behalf of the Native Media Center and Native Directions staff and students to notify you that we are in full support of UND's Student Senate Resolution 18 and North Dakota's House Concurrent Resolution 3024 to change the University's "Fighting Sioux" nickname and logo.

We believe the "Fighting Sioux" nickname and icon perpetuate negative and derogatory stereotypes of Native people, especially the Lakota, Nakota, and Dakota people.

We believe the nickname works against the University's mission to promote diversity and pluralism and as "a conduit through which individual perspectives and global interrelationships are enhanced by a learning and teaching environment that is aware of and sensitive to the diversity of its constituents.

We believe the University of North Dakota promotes racism, bigotry, and harassment through its continued use of the "Fighting Sioux" nickname and logo.

We consider the nickname and its prolific use to be, at best, unethical and, at worst, dehumanizing.

We respectfully urge University of North Dakota students, staff, faculty, senators and administrators, and North Dakota legislators to lead the way in progressie reform and change UND's nickname to one that truly honors our great university and state.

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Three Affiliated Tribes

Resolution No. 02-031-RP

Resolution of the Governing Body of the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation

A Resolution entitled, "Opposition to the University of North Dakota's use of the Fighting Sioux name and logo"

WHEREAS, This Nation having accepted the Indian Reogranization Act of June 18, 1934, and the authority under said Act; and

WHEREAS, The Three Affiliated Tribes Consitution authorizes and empowers the Mandan, Hidatsa & Arikara Tribal Business Council to engage in activity on behalf of and in the interest of the welfare and benefit of the Tribes an of the enrolled members thereof; and

WHEREAS, the use of an American Indian stereotype demeaning by its very nature, whethere intended as such or not; and

WHEREAS, these stereotypical symbols create an environment in which degrading acts become more acceptable and promote practices that trivalize and demean Native American culture, traditions and spirituality; and

WHEREAS, this is an issue of human rights because the use of such a name and symbol at the University of North Dakota limits the ability of all Native Students to learn and take part in campus and community activities; and

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Mandan Hidatsa & Arikara Nation does hereby support the ending of the use of outdated and politically incorrect American Indian stereotypes at the University of North Dakota and all across America that demean the history and culture of Indian nations; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that Mandan Hidatsa & Arikara Nation supports the aforementioned request to end the University of North Dakota's use of the "Fighting Sioux" name and its accompanying "Indian-head" symbol; and

FINALLY, BE IT RESOLVES, that Mandan Hidatsa & Arikara nation does hereby support this resolution in response to end the national use of stereotypical images that demean, rather than honor American Indian Nations.

 

CERTIFICATION

I, the undersigned, as Secretary of the Tribal Business Council of the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Indain Reservation hereby certify that the tribal Business Council is composed of seven (7) members of whom five (5) constitute a quorum, 6 were present at a Regular Meetings thereof duly called, noticed, convened and held on the 21st day of November, 2002, that the foregoing Resolution was duly adopted at such meeting by the affirmative vote of 6 members, 0 members opposed, 0 members abstained, 0 members not voting, and that said Resolution has not been rescinded or amended in any way.

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Resolutions generously digitized by Jack Baker.